Category Archives: Uncategorized

Play With Me

On Wednesday I had the chance to visit my first classroom this school year. Sadly, in my role as curriculum coordinator, I don’t get to do this nearly enough. So I relish opportunities like this. Even better than visiting, the teacher allowed me to play a math game with her class.

I had so much fun!

I wanted something simple and quick to get the kids engaged before moving on to another activity. I also wanted it to involve adding 3-digit numbers because her class is in the middle of a unit on that very topic. I also wanted to bring in some place value understanding and reasoning, which are very much related to adding multi-digit numbers.

Basically I brought two decks of cards – one had Care Bears on the back and the other had Spider-Man on the back. I wanted different backs to the cards so it would be easier to tell which cards were mine and which were my opponent’s in case we needed to reference them during or after the game. I also pulled out all of the 10s and face cards, with the exception of the aces. I kept those and we decided to use them as zeroes. I tell you this because if you ever want to play a game that involves digit cards, here is a great way to get some without having to painstakingly cut out cards to make your own sets. Decks of cards are cheap enough. Just use those.

The game was me vs. the class. The goal is to make two 3-digit numbers. Whoever has the greater sum wins. On my turn, I drew a card, and I had a choice of putting it blank spots that I used to create two 3-digit numbers. Once a digit was placed it couldn’t be moved. On the class’ turn, I drew the card for them, but I let them tell me where to place the digit.

My favorite part of the game was at the end when the kids started shouting out that they’d won without even finding the sum. Take a look and see why they got excited: (Just pretend I hadn’t written the sums yet. I took the picture after the game was over.)

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“You have a 9 and a 4 in the hundreds place. We have a 5 and a 9.”

“Interesting, and how does that tell you you’ve won?”

“Because the 9s are the same. And we have a 5 which is greater than 4. You should have put your 5 in the hundreds place.”

“I was hedging my bets and I lost.”

Such wonderful thinking from a 3rd grader! How often do students rush to calculate and find an answer to a problem? How amazing that these students were paying attention to the place value that matters most in these numbers – the hundreds – and then comparing the digits to determine who had a greater sum?

Since I was just the lead-in to the day’s activities we only got to play once, but I would have loved to play again. I would have liked to change it up a bit. I would still construct my number on the board, but then I would have allowed everyone to create their own number at their desk using the cards that I drew on their turn. At the end we would discuss who thinks they have the greatest sum and talk about their placement of digits.

Even though I didn’t get to play again, I’ll take the time I did have. It was the highlight of my week!

More Than Words

Yesterday Tracy Zager shared a heartbreaking post that every teacher should take a few minutes to read.

The gist of it is that teachers need to be mindful about the messages they send students and parents about learning and doing mathematics. Sometimes damaging messages come across in the form of words – “You may not talk to anyone as you work.” – but they also come across in our choices of lessons and activities we do in our classrooms – such as a long pre-assessment that most students will “fail” because they unsurprisingly don’t yet know the content from their new grade level.

But there’s hope! This Tweet sums it up nicely:

I’ve been especially encouraged while reading the latest blog posts from the members of my Math Rocks cohort. Back in July we watched Tracy’s Shadow Con talk. Afterward everyone took Tracy’s call to action to choose a word to guide their math planning at the start of the year.

Flash forward a month and the school year is finally getting underway. Our latest Math Rocks mission was to re-watch Tracy’s talk and to watch my own Shadow Con talk since the two are very much related. Then they had to choose one of our calls to action to follow and write a blog post reflecting on their experiences as they kicked off the school year.

The results have been so inspiring! I’ve collected all of their posts in this document. Take a look. Just reading the titles of their posts makes me happy, and if you go on to read them, I hope you’ll finish with as big of a smile on your face as I have.

Math Rocks Redux Part 1

This time last year, @reginarocks and I kicked off our inaugural Math Rocks cohort. We spent two awesome days of PD together with a group of 30 elementary teachers which you can read about here and here.

And this time this year, we kicked off our second Math Rocks cohort which you can read about in this very post!

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For those who want to stick to the present and not go back into last year’s posts, Math Rocks is our district cohort for elementary teachers to grow as math teachers. Our two focus goals for the year are building relationships around mathematics and fostering curiosity about mathematics. The cohort meets for two full days in July followed up by 9 after school sessions, September through January, and a final half day session together in February. It’s intense, but so rewarding to get to work with teachers for such an extended amount of time!

I want to write a post about this year’s Math Rocks cohort to give you some insight into what stayed the same and what changed. Now that we’ve gone through this once, we knew there were some things we wanted to tweak. Without further ado…

One thing that stayed the same was kicking off Math Rocks with a little Estimation 180! The purpose behind this was twofold. First, we did it as a getting-to-know-you activity. Once everyone was ready, we had them mingle and make friends while answering questions like:

  • What is an estimate that is too LOW?
  • What is an estimate that is too HIGH?
  • What is your estimate?
  • Where’s the math? and
  • Which grade levels could do this activity?

Second, throughout day 1 we snuck in a couple of activities like Estimation 180 that were created by members of the Math Twitter Blog-o-Sphere (#MTBoS for short). Later in the day we introduced the cohort to the MTBoS, and it’s nice to be able to say, “Oh by the way, remember those Estimation 180 and Which One Doesn’t Belong? activities we did? Those are created by members of this community we’re introducing you to. Isn’t that awesome?!”

Last year we did a community circle after the Estimation 180 activity, but I scrapped it this year in order to streamline our day and add time for the biggest change to day 1, which I’ll talk about in a bit. Instead, we moved right into the ShadowCon15 talks from Tracy Zager and Kristin Gray that serve the purpose of setting up our two Math Rocks goals.

Just like last year, we had the participants reflect before Tracy’s video. They had to create three images that symbolized what math was like to them as a student. It’s fascinating (and concerning) to see how many images involve computation facts practice of some sort:

Even more fascinating (and sadly disturbing) was listening to participants’ horror stories about fact practice as a child. One person talked about the teacher hitting students on the back of the hand for getting problems wrong on timed tests. Another one said the teacher had everyone in class hiss at students who got problems wrong. Hiss! Can you believe that?!

We only made a slight change to this portion of the day. Last year we prefaced each video with a description we got from the ShadowCon site. This year I let the talks speak for themselves. It seemed more powerful to let Tracy and Kristin build their own arguments without priming the pump so much.

I mentioned earlier we left out the community circle in the morning to make room for the biggest change to day 1. Let me tell you about that. Introducing goal #2 leads us into one of the biggest components of Math Rocks, joining Twitter and creating a blog. In order to build relationships and foster curiosity, I want my teachers to experience being members of the MTBoS during their time in Math Rocks.

Last year I gave directions here and here on our Math Rocks blog. I shared the links to those two blog posts and set them loose to get started. To say we ran into problems is a vast understatement. I severely underestimated the support needed to get 30 teachers with widely varying comfort levels with technology connected to Twitter and blogging. No offense to them – they were great sports about it – but I definitely threw our first cohort in the deep end and I’m lucky (and thankful!) they all came back for day 2.

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This year I slowed things down quite a bit, and together we walked through the process of creating a Twitter account and a blog. I ended up spending about an hour and fifteen minutes on each part. That’s how much I learned from last year’s experience! Slow and steady wins this race. For those who were comfortable getting started on their own, I gave them their tasks up front here and here so they didn’t have to sit and wait for the rest of us.

Oh, that reminds me of another behind-the-scenes change this year. Instead of using a blog to share missions, I decided to try Google Classroom. I made separate assignments of creating a Twitter account and creating a blog, and the documents I linked in the previous paragraph were linked to those assignments. I haven’t done much else with Google classroom yet, so I’m not sure if it’s going to be a better choice or not, but so far it’s working out okay.

Doing all of that pretty much took up the rest of day 1, with the exception of a little Which One Doesn’t Belong? to give us a break between introducing Twitter and blogging.

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All in all, I’m happy we were able to keep so much of day 1 intact. I feel like the structure of it does a nice job of establishing our goals for the year and I’m happy I was able to find a way to get everyone connected to Twitter and blogging in a less stressful way.

Day 2, on the other hand, is completely different from last year, and I look forward to writing about that in my next post.

 

Writing Numberless Word Problems

So you came across my post on numberless word problems, you got excited by the idea, but you’re left wondering, “Where does he get the problems from?” Good question! I thought it was high time I answer it.

For starters, I try to avoid writing problems from scratch whenever possible. I can do it, and I have done it on numerous occasions, but I’ll be honest, it’s mentally exhausting if you have to write more than one or two problems in one sitting! It takes a lot of work to think of context after context for a variety of math topics, especially if you don’t want to feel like you’re reusing the same context over and over again.

I’ll let you in on a secret. More often than not, I base my questions on existing questions out in the world. I don’t reuse them wholesale, partly because I don’t want to infringe on copyright and partly because I don’t want to deprive teachers in my district of an existing problem they could be using with their students.

I always change names and numbers, and as needed I tweak the contexts and questions. This is so much easier than writing problems from scratch! Basing my problems on existing problems makes me feel like I’m starting 10-20 steps ahead of where I would have otherwise!

I’ll share a few problems I’ve created to give you an idea of what I’m talking about. I based all three of them off grade 3 2015 STAAR sample questions released by the Texas Education Agency.

Problem 1

Here’s the original problem:

 

Question3

First, I thought about how I could adjust the problem to make it my own:

  • I decided to change the character to Jenise.
  • I changed “flowers” to “carrot plants.”
  • I changed 21 to 24. I did this intentionally because 24 has so many factors. You’ll see how this plays out when you get to the sample questions I created later.
  • I removed the number 3 altogether. Again, this plays out later when I created questions about the situation.

Note: This step is only necessary if you want to create a unique problem. The released tests are free to be used, so you could just as easily convert this exact problem into a numberless word problem. Again, I don’t want to steal resources from my teachers so I’m opting to change this into a new problem.

Next, I think about how I want to scaffold presenting the information in the problem. I create slides, one for each phase of revealing information. Remember, the purpose of a numberless word problem is to give students an opportunity to collaboratively identify and make sense of mathematical relationships in a situation before being presented with a question. There are several factors that dictate how much or how little new information to present on each slide:

  • Students’ attention span
  • Students’ familiarity with the type of situation being presented
  • Students’ familiarity with the math concepts involved in the situation

Here’s how I broke down this question into 4 slides:

Slide 13-1

Slide 23-2

Slide 33-3

Slide 43-4

Thinking this would be used in a 3rd grade classroom, I opted to break it down quite a bit to draw emphasis on the language of “rows” and “same number in each row.” If I already knew my students were comfortable connecting this language to multiplication and division, then I probably would have combined slides 2 and 3 into one slide.

At this point, I stop and think about what question I want to ask about the full situation on slide 4. If I were a teacher, I might select a question and keep it in my pocket. After discussing slide 4, I’d ask my students what questions they think could be asked about this situation. Students need opportunities to generate problems for themselves, not just be told the problems we expect them to solve. I could allow them to answer their own question before answering the one I had planned (or instead of!).

Here are a few questions I generated that I might ask about this situation:

3-q

This is where changing 21 to 24 in the problem adds some richness to the potential questions I could ask about this situation. This is also the reason I removed the number 3 from the original problem. Not specifying the number of rows allowed me more flexibility to ask about either the number of rows or the number of plants in each row.

Problem 2

Here’s the original problem:

Question2

I like this problem, so I didn’t want to change it too much. Here are the changes I decided to make. Remember, I always change names and numbers; context and question are tweaked as necessary.

  • I changed the character to Mrs. Prentice.
  • I changed the food from “yoghurt cups” to “pints of ice cream.”
  • I changed the flavors to chocolate, strawberry, and vanilla.
  • I changed all three numbers. However, I noted that there was a way to make ten (6 + 4) in the ones, tens, and hundreds places across the 3 numbers, so I tried to create a similar structure in my numbers with 3 + 7.

With those changes, here’s how I scaffolded the problem across 5 slides:

Slide 12-1

Slide 22-2

Slide 32-3

Slide 42-4

Slide 52-5

Depending on my students, I might have combined slides 4 and 5. Keeping them separate means I can play it safe. I can reveal each number one at a time, but I can also breeze through slides 3 and 4 if the situation warrants it and spend more time talking about all three numbers on slide 5.

And finally, it’s time to think of some potential questions that can be asked about this situation:

2-q

By the way, this is a great time to point out that I don’t have to pick just one! I spent valuable time crafting the situation and my students will spend valuable time making sense of the situation. Milk it for all it’s worth!

I could pose one question today for students to solve and discuss. Tomorrow we could revisit the same situation, maybe just talking about slide 5 together to jog our memories, and then I could give them another question to solve about this situation. I could even pose 2-3 questions and let the students choose which one they want to solve. Be creative!

Problem 3

Here’s the original problem:

Question1

I like this one because I’m able to take a 3rd grade problem and make it fit concepts for grades 3-5. In this case, I didn’t change as much of the original problem because the context is so simple. Here are the 3 slides I created to scaffold presenting the information:

Slide 11-1

Slide 21-2

Slide 31-3

It’s important to remember that the power of a numberless word problem lies in the conversation students have as you reveal each new piece of information. That conversation is driven by the questions you ask as more and more information is revealed. Here are sample questions you could use as you discuss each slide of a numberless word problem:

  • What do you know?
  • What information have you been given?
  • What do you understand about the information given?
  • What kind of problem could this be?
  • What information do you know now?
  • Does this new information help you?
  • What does the new information tell you?
  • How does the new information change or support your thinking?
  • What operation(s) does this situation make you think about?
  • What kinds of questions could be asked about this situation? (This can be asked on several slides, not just the final one.)

The fun part for this particular situation was thinking of all the different questions I could ask:

1-q

So there you have it – three very different examples of numberless word problems. As cool as I think numberless word problems are, please note that not every problem needs to be a numberless word problem. We have to be intentional about when and how much we provide scaffolding to our students. However, knowing about this type of problem is a great tool to have in your belt when you’re looking for ways to help your students develop a deeper understanding of the mathematical relationships in real life situations.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask in the comments!

[UPDATE – I’ve made a page on my blog devoted to numberless word problems. Check it out for more resources.]

 

Better Questions: Math Rocks Meets Open Middle

betterquestions

This year I have been leading a cohort of elementary math educators in my district. We met for two full days in July – you can read about that here and here – and throughout this school year we’ve met every other Thursday after school.

In December, our meeting focused on the work of Robert Kaplinsky, specifically his IGNITE talk about productive struggle and his website openmiddle.com.

At the start of the session, everyone reflected on what “productive struggle” means to them. This is important because as certain phrases become popular in education, they quickly become jargon. I wanted to ensure everyone had a chance to think about how they interpret the phrase and share that with the group. Then we watched Robert’s IGNITE talk.

The image that stood out most to me from his talk was the one of the mom riding the bike for her child. It seems so silly, and yet there are many instances as teachers where we can find ourselves doing the thinking for our students instead of letting them try either on their own or with our support.

At the end of the video, Robert puts out a call to action for teachers to create opportunities for students to productively struggle. And why not start by having the Math Rocks participants do some productive struggling of their own? Regina and I posted 10 problems around the room. We let everyone loose to do some math for 15 minutes. They dove right in!

All 10 problems came from openmiddle.com. If you aren’t familiar with the open middle problem type, here’s a brief summary: (You can learn more here.)

  • they have a “closed beginning” meaning they all start with the same initial problem
  • they have a “closed end” meaning that they all end with the same answer
  • they have an “open middle” meaning there are multiple ways to approach and ultimately solve the problem

After debriefing as a group and sharing information about open middle problems, we came back around to the idea of productive struggle with this video from Michael Pershan. The whole thing is interesting, but for the purposes of our discussion, we watched the first 30 seconds of the video, and then we watched from 1:45 to 5:45.

By this point, we had made our case and it was time for the participants to take a stab at designing their own open middle problems. They had a choice of writing one from scratch or taking an existing problem from our curriculum and redesigning it as an open middle problem. A nice surprise is that our adopted textbook, Stepping Stones, already uses open middle problems in many lessons and activities! They don’t name them as such, but that’s essentially what they are.

We shared out the open middle problems they wrote. Afterward we gathered them together in this document if you’d like to see our first attempts. We closed the session with their homework assignment – giving their students an open middle problem and reflecting on it in a blog post. If you’re interested in learning more about open middle problems – especially learning from teachers trying them out for the first time! – check out our open middle blog post collection.

The consensus from the group seems to be that they can initially throw kids off if they’re not used to being asked questions like this, especially for those kids who want to neatly and easily come to the correct answer, but the questions provide opportunities for the type of thinking and struggling we want our students to engage in and we need to be using them more often.

My Favorite: Holidays at Target

myfav

Here we are in Week 2 of the ExploreMTBoS 2016 Blogging Initiative! This week’s challenge is to blog about one of my favorite things. During this school year, one of my favorite things has been visiting Target during the holidays. The holiday-themed merchandise is rich with mathematical possibilities! I already wrote three posts about a treasure trove of images from Halloween:

Valentine’s Day is around the corner, and I snapped some photos this evening to share with you. I’m going to cover a range of mathematical skills – mostly centered around estimation –  from Kinder through about Grade 6 to show you just how versatile this stuff is!

These first two images are good for estimating quantity. You can estimate the quantities individually. Don’t forget to ask students to estimate an answer that is TOO HIGH and one that is TOO LOW in addition to their actual estimate. Coming up with a reasonable range takes a lot of practice! You could also show students both images at the same time and ask, “Which package has more?”

I forgot to snap a picture of the answers, but I can tell you there are 15 bouncy balls and 24 eraser rings.

Here’s another one. How many Kisses are in the box?

IMG_2053

I was kind of surprised that the answer wasn’t an even number like 10 or 12. This just seems oddly specific.

KissesHeart-Reveal

Students tend to estimate better when the quantities are smaller. Here’s a larger quantity package to up the challenge a bit. How many gumballs are in the bag?

Gumballs-Estimate

I was kind of surprised to find out the answer myself.

Gumballs-Reveal

This next one is tricky! How many truffles are in the box? Go ahead and make an estimate.

TruffleHeart-Estimate

Now that you’ve made your estimate, I’d like to show you how deceptive product packaging can be. Would you like to revise your estimate?

TruffleHeart-NewInfo

And now for the reveal. How does your estimate compare to the actual amount?

TruffleHeart-Reveal

The first few images dealt with disorganized quantities. Once we move into organization, the thinking can extend into multiplicative reasoning. The great thing is that it doesn’t have to! Students can find the total by counting by 1s, skip counting, and/or using multiplication.

There are several questions you can ask about these pictures. They’re of the same box. I just gave different perspective. I’d probably show the almost-front view first to see what kids think before showing the top-down view.

  • How many boxes of chocolate were in the case when it was full?
  • How many boxes of chocolate are left?
  • How many boxes of chocolate are gone?

Here’s another package that could prove a bit tricky for some students. How many heart stickers are in this package?

HeartStickers-Estimate

Students might notice that the package says 2 sheets. If they don’t, you might show them the package from a different perspective.HeartStickers-NewInfo

And finally, you can reveal the total.

HeartStickers-Reveal

This next package can be shown one of two ways depending on how much challenge you want to provide the students. Even with some of the hearts covered, students can still reason about the total quantity.

This next one could simply be used to ask how many squares of chocolate are in the box, but what I’d really like to know is how many ounces/grams of chocolate are in the box.

ChocoSquares-Estimate

After some estimating, you could show your students this and let them flex their decimal computation skills to find the total.

ChocoSquares-One

However, the reveal is likely to raise some eyebrows.

And finally, you can do some more decimal calculations with this final product. How much would it cost to buy all of the boxes shown?

BigHeart-Estimate

And if you bought all 6 boxes, how many ounces of chocolate would you be getting?

BigHeart-Estimate2

Ten minutes in the holiday aisle and my iPhone are all it took to gather this wealth of math questions can now be shared with students. Even better, I didn’t have to purchase any of these products! Even better than that, I can go back for every major holiday to capture new images that will feel timely and relevant!

By the way, feel free to use any and all of these images with your own students. They’re fairly low quality so I don’t recommend printing them, but they should look just fine projected or shown on a screen.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

A Day in the Life of a Curriculum Coordinator: Friday

Here are links to all the posts I wrote this week:

Friday

If you’ve been following along this week, you’ll notice there’s no post for Thursday. That’s because I stayed home sick. I did check a few emails, but mostly I slept or lounged around the house feeling crummy. Not very exciting material to blog about. The highlight was going out in the backyard to refill the squirrel and bird feeders.

Granted, I took it slow today so I’m not sure how exciting today was either. I felt well enough to get up and go in to work, but after an hour or two, my energy level dipped and stayed low throughout most of the day. As I was getting ready to write this post I tried recalling my day and realized I did so many little things I couldn’t remember a lot of what I’d done! Thankfully much of it revolves around email, so a quick review of my Sent email folder did a pretty good job of refreshing my memory.

My first main task this morning was preparing our STAAR Ready assessment to be converted into Braille. The STAAR Ready is our spring district assessment for grades 3-5. Usually each subject area uses the previous year’s released state test. Unfortunately, Texas did not release the 2015 math tests so we had to put one together ourselves. Using the state test blueprints, we pulled one together for each grade level using sample items released by the state last summer and our own items we wrote for last year’s STAAR Ready. That was quite the ordeal right before and after winter break, and I’ll spare you the specifics. Needless to say, I’m looking forward to using the 2016 released tests next school year!

Anyway, back to today, I had to convert the PDF of the 5th grade assessment to a Word document because reproducing the test in Braille, especially the graphics, works much better in Word. Thankfully Adobe Pro makes converting a PDF to Word super easy, but that doesn’t mean the resulting document is flawless. I went through the Word document question by question to ensure text and/or graphics converted correctly. For the most part they did, but every now and then a table or fraction didn’t convert correctly so I had to fix it.

Once that was done, I stopped to review our department budget. This is one area of the job that was new for me when I started a year and a half ago. I haven’t really had to do a lot with budgeting in previous jobs. My department is only two people, me and Regina, but we have a department budget that we use to pay for:

  • Substitutes so teachers can come work on curriculum
  • Extra duty pay to teachers or coaches to do after hours curriculum work
  • General supplies – office supplies, professional books, etc.
  • Memberships to groups such as TASM and NCTM
  • Registration to conferences
  • Snacks for teachers who attend PD sessions
  • Other miscellaneous expenses

Since our budget is limited, I have to monitor how we spend our money as well as plan ahead to ensure we can pay for the things we want. For example, bringing in K-5 teachers for a few days in the spring to do curriculum revisions with us is probably our largest expenditure each year, so I have to keep that money untouched for most of the school year.

This morning I went through my budget, determined where money needed to be moved around to, and then sent off a request to make that happen. That’s one of the lessons I’ve learned in this role: We are highly accountable for our money and how it’s used! There are very strict policies and procedures surrounding it. For example, I can’t just spend willy-nilly. If I want to buy snacks but all of my money is in extra duty pay, then I have to submit a budget amendment for approval before I can spend the money. Most likely it’s going to be approved, but that goes to show how firm they are about the process. Considering our district is funded by tax payer money, they want to ensure we are using our money responsibly, ethically, and legally. And we must be doing something right, because we’re the only district in the state of Texas to earn a AAA bond rating from Fitch and Moody’s. (I had no idea what that meant at first, but apparently it speaks to how fiscally responsible we are.)

Speaking of money, once I sent off that email, I hopped in the car and drove over to our Purchasing department to pick up my new Purchasing credit card. This is what I use to pay for small expenses such as  food if I’m traveling out of town or if I’m at a conference and want to pay for some books. I was supposed to pick up the card back in December, but I’d been so busy I never felt like I could get away to go pick it up. Thankfully I can check that off my to-do list finally!

Now that I think a bout it, today was a very financial day for me. Once I got back to the office, I had to do some work with two orders that I recently submitted for the books Beyond Pizzas and Pies and Beyond Invert and Multiply and sets of Cuisenaire rods. All of the materials are going to our campus libraries, so I needed to communicate with them to let them know that the orders are going to be coming in soon. First I had to talk to our Library Coordinator to give her the information so she could create records of the items in our library system. Then I shared a spreadsheet with the campuses where they can log when the orders are received so we can then pay the vendor for the materials. The teachers who attended our fraction PD sessions on Wednesday are chomping at the bit for these materials, so I’m excited that they should be arriving any day now!

Before lunch I met with our Director of Response to Intervention to talk about training and support for math intervention. I shared ideas for diagnostic assessments and PD opportunities, including Math Recovery and Kathy Richardson’s Assessing Math Concepts series. It makes me happy that our district has been providing a lot of support to our interventionists last year and this year. I’ve been hearing some great success stories from some of our campuses which makes me even happier!

After lunch the entire Teaching & Learning Department (elementary and secondary) met in curriculum work committees. Back in September we took Level I Curriculum Auditing training, and now we’re doing work in committees to take what we learned and do what we can to improve our curriculum processes and materials. My committee is looking at the curriculum writing and review process. We’re looking at it from the perspective of any given year – what does the revision process look like in terms of timeline and tasks. But we are also looking at the cycle over multiple years – what work is done in year 1 of a curriculum, year 2, year 3+?

This has been interesting for me because last year was year 1 for the elementary math curriculum. The 2014-15 school year was the first year that teachers taught the new math TEKS, and boy was it a bumpy ride! We learned a lot, and as a result we made pretty significant changes for the 2015-16 school year. Now I have my eye on the revisions for the 2016-17 school year, and it’s interesting to see how I’m able to focus on different things now than I was able to in years 1 and 2. Those first two years were just about getting a handle on it. Now I feel like we’re in a place to refine and improve. It’s a lot of work, but I’m excited to see the curriculum evolving as we go.

After our committee meetings, we met as a whole group to share out, provide feedback, and ask questions. There’s a lot of work left to do, but it’s exciting that we’re able to shape our district’s curriculum together as a team.

And that wraps up my week! That’s just a taste of what I do day in and day out, but hopefully it provides some insights. If you have any questions, hit me up in the comments. Otherwise, I’m off to enjoy the weekend with my family!